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Tips For Introducing A Dog To A New Home

June 21, 2017

Make sure your best friend is able to be comfortable in their new home. 

 

Introducing a dog to a new home is not nearly as difficult as a cat, but there can still be some issues. Dogs are territorial, and they crave routine and familiarity. Luckily, as long as the basics are the same as the old home, dogs can adapt pretty quickly to a new situation. Here are a few ways to make the transition to a new home go much easier:

 

1. Keep your dog on a leash while showing them the house and the yard

 

Your canine compatriot may be a little confused and overwhelmed in their brand new surroundings. All the new sights and smells can be a bit much, especially if your dog is already a bit anxious. You can help ease this anxiety by keeping them on a leash as you show them the rooms and yard in their new home. The leash will help them feel safe and secure, so they will be much happier to explore with you.

 

2. Make sure valuable or dangerous things are out of reach

 

Even if your dog seems to be adjusting well, they are more prone to chew on things the first few weeks of being in a new location. Make sure any valuable or dangerous items are put up or away so that your dog cannot get to them, especially if you do not crate them when you leave. Even dogs that do not regularly chew things may slip up due to the stress and unfamiliarity of a new situation. If you catch your dog chewing, stop them and redirect them to an appropriate toy. If you come home to find things chewed up, it does no good to shove the dog’s nose in it or punish them after the fact. Clean up, take note of it, and take precautions to keep it from happening again.

 

3. Keep certain routines as close to regular as possible

 

If you always walk your dog as soon as you wake up or get home from work, keep that routine. If they get fed at 6:37 on the dot, keep to that as well. One of the easiest ways to acclimate a dog to new surroundings is by keeping their old routines going. They will soon realize that only the setting has changed, and this should help them adjust to a new home very quickly.

 

4. Try to avoid large groups of people in the home for a few weeks

 

When moving to a new home, everyone wants to have guests over and show it off. This can compound stress and put some severe scares into your dog. If you are having people over, especially if your dog is unfamiliar with them, it can be a good idea to let them meet the dog outside. This is a more neutral ground, and your dog will not feel as protective or unsafe as they would meeting someone in a brand new home. Your guests should avoid chasing, hugging, or petting on the head until the dog is ready; it may take awhile for them to adapt to the new situation. However, your dog will let people know when they are ready.

 

5. Give plenty of extra love and support

 

Moving to a new home can be scary; you and your dog can be supports for one another. Spend extra time with your pooch - lounge on the couch together, take some extra walks, and give plenty of treats and love. You can both help ease each other’s stress by being there and taking care of one another, and that will help you both adjust to the new home.

 

Moving to a new home doesn’t have to be a huge pain, but it can be a stressor. Stressed dogs sometimes have accidents or get sick in the house, so it is a good idea to have a odor and stain remover like Bio-nihilator on hand for just such an issue. Clean up fast and help keep your new home your favorite place to be, for both you and your hound.

 

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